Naughty or Nice?

What pops down a chimney and out a fireplace? Santa Kitten!

These cute little kittens jumped out at me while in a Tuesday Morning store. They are on cellophane treat bags. I realized that they were the correct size for one of Karen Burniston’s interactive dies – the Pop ‘n Swap.

While I would classify this card as a prototype, what I wanted to share is to show how you can make a shallow box like structure to create a fireplace over the pop ’n swap mechanism. Watch Karen Burniston’s assembly video to learn how to put together this mechanism.

For this slimline card, I cut a piece of heavy black cardstock 8 ½ x 8 inches and scored at 4 inches and folded in half to create the card base. (The card needs to be at least 4 inches wide since the mechanism folded flat is 4 inches wide.) Next, I cut from the front top of the card base a rectangle 2 ½ x 4 inches to allow the Santa kitten to show over the chimney top.

The inside shallow box is a 5 3/4 inches tall by 4 7/8 inches wide rectangle of red cardstock. I scored at ¼ inch, 1 inch and 4 inches. (Because the mechanism is ¾ inches tall, the box side is ¾ inches deep.) All the folds are mountain folds. The narrow tab goes towards the right edge of the card while the wide tab goes towards the inside fold.  I glued my mechanism in first, and then using removable tape, I played with the positioning of the box and marked with pencil its placement before removing the box. I cut the widow to show the kitten inside the fireplace, by laying the fireplace frame over the mechanism and seeing where the kitten would best show. Next, I placed  a loop of removable tape on the fireplace and positioned the box back into place and got the fireplace to stick to the inside of the box. With the fireplace stuck I removed the box and traced the opening of the fireplace onto the back of the box. With a metal ruler and craft knife, I cut the opening slightly larger than the pencil marks. Now the box is ready to be permanently glued in place. Glue the kittens in place next on the mechanism arms, cutting any corners that show beyond the kittens.

For decorating of the fireplace and mantel refer to my An Old-Time Christmas post. The brick is stenciled on the chimney panel before cutting it for the front. The fireplace was stenciled once the opening was cut for the fireplace, but before the box was glued permanently in place.

I tried a new-to-me product from Cosmic Shimmer called Fluffy Stuff. It is a thick paint-like substance that you can add dimension with for snow. You use a heat gun to get it to bubble up. I tried adding it to the front of the card after I assembled the card and in the heating of the card, I ended up heating the cellophane of the top kitten which shrunk a little. My recommendation is to add the Fluffy Stuff to your front panel before it is glued on to the card so that you can heat it and left it dry for 24 hours before gluing in place. (Here is a video that shows Fluffy Stuff being demonstrated on the Beebaab Youtube channel.)

If you have read this far, I’ll let you in on a secret. There is a free down of the “Naughty or Nice” sentiment in the supplies list.

Hope this card makes you smile.

SUPPLIES

Dies

Stamps/Stencils

Inks/Colors

Paper

Miscellaneous

© Sue Small-Kreider 2020

Bounty of the Season

“May the bounty of the season fill your heart and home” is the message of this layered Thanksgiving card. It uses the October 2020 Large Die of the Month by Spellbinders as well as a variety of other brands’ elements to make a 6 ½ x 5 inches card with matching envelope.

I started by using an older Tim Holtz brick stencil with his fired brick Distress Ink on a 6 x 4 ½ inches brick red cardstock. I went through my paper scrap bins for the paper that I cut the rest of the scene’s elements, much of it coming from junk mail advertisements and envelopes. The brass letter slot and doorknob where from a candy box.

The window was cut twice from white and black cardstock and pieced together. All the white elements were cut from shiny coated packaging. Several years ago, I employed a tiny Fiskars oak leaf punch to cut the colorful leaves from junk mail. The leaves were used to make the door wreath which uses the wreath from the die set as a base. The welcome mat is cut from a brown craft paper.

By laying out the doorway pieces on the stenciled red panel I knew where to glue the bottom step piece and then the left column, red door and right column followed by the top piece. (I recommend watching the assembly video to understand how the pieces all go together.) A sticky tip tool is especially useful in assembling this doorway scene’s tiny pieces.

After the glue on the front panel was dry, I took a soft glue eraser to the white sections to erase the glue smudges.

I stamped the inside sentiment using paper masks (from sticky note paper) to allow only the intended sections to be stamped using three colors. The order of stamping was light to darkest ink – orange, green, brown. I placed a fussy-cut mask of the pumpkin after the orange layer was stamped which is hard to see in the photos showing what I masked for each stamping layer. Before I stamped the sentiment stamp in brown, I removed the pumpkin vine stamp from the stamping platform.

As is my style, I like to stamp the envelope flap with a hint of what’s inside.

SUPPLIES

Dies/Punches

Stamps/Stencils

Ink

Paper

Miscellaneous