A Stately Home for the Holidays

Victorian mansions of Italianate design fit so well into the Currier and Ives world of 19th Century images of Christmas, suggesting the warm and good cheer to be found inside such homes.

This card was made with Anna Griffin dies and stamps as well as printed card base and envelope.

While the mansion is intended to be used as a Halloween haunted house, the tower and arched windows reminded me of numerous red brick houses in the Midwestern United States. I cut the house twice from red cardstock, once from cream colored cardstock, and once from slate gray cardstock. Using the detailed window dies, I cut just enough of the different windows to match the various windows on the house from cream cardstock. From one of the red houses, I cut the porch walls with stairs attached, pillars, porch roof and tower above. I adhered the tower with thin foam squares and the porch brick walls with thick foam squares onto the other red house. From the cream-colored house, I cut the top porch wall decorations, front steps, porch pillars and porch roof. These were glued onto the red house.  From the slate gray house, I cut all the roof pieces including the porch roof. These were glued on to the base bouse. From the cream-colored house, I cut the eaves trim and tower fence railings. These railings and the top roof railings I colored with a gold metallic marker. The cream window frames were the last bits glued on to the house base.

Using the outline die of the Halloween house die, I cut a yellow patterned paper back for the house and glued the house onto it. 

For the Christmas wreaths and evergreen trees, I used dies from the Holiday Home Ease Card dies. Tiny scraps of patterned and textured papers add life to these wee decorations.

To turn the beautifully foiled card base into a slider card, I measured the finished house and lightly traced around the shape to know here the slider easel needed to be cut into the card base. (See this earlier slider card blog for more details.) The slider arm was cut using the door outline die from the Slimline Door die set and trimmed to fit the card base. A small hole punch was used to have a place to tie a ribbon pull onto the slider card which is hidden when the card is closed. A thumb hole was cut through both layers of the closed card base at the card top in the center using a 1-inch hole punch.

Before assembling the card, the sentiments were stamped with watermark ink and heat embossed on a cream piece of paper for the “Merry Christmas” and “Happy New Year” on to the top of the slider arm.

To assemble, the slider arm was glued to the backside of the lower tab of the slider easel. Next, using two layers of double-sided tape on the inside of the card base, along the two sides and bottom of the slider frame, the card was adhered shut.

The house was attached to the slider easel with foam pads on the front half of the easel. Ribbon was tied to the slider arm as well as a tiny tag saying “PULL” to ensure good CRX. (For more on good CRX see earlier blogs.)

Envelopes should never be left plain. They are the first hint as to what is inside. For this card I used a holly sprig stamped in dark green ink to set the Victorian mood of the card to come.

Thank you for reading. If you enjoyed this blog post, please like it and follow the blog. 😊

Click here for a list of other house cards on my blog.

Dies:

Stamps

Inks & Embossing Powders

  • VersaMark – Watermark Stamp Pad
  • Stampin’ Up – Classic Stampin’ Pad – Tranquil Tide
  • Nuvo Embossing Powder – Crimson Gloss
  • CraftStash – Gold Embossing Powder – from 2020 Advent Calendar
  • Gold metallic marker

Papers

  • Colored and white cardstock
  • Pattered paper from Mrs. Sparkle paper pads
  • Card base and envelope from Anna Griffin’s Present Pop-Up Card Making Kit

Additional Supplies:

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